Friday, October 30, 2009

Just because you can, Doesn't mean you should

In the November 2009 edition of PCTODAY Magazine, in an article entitled “Twitter for Business”, the author explores the use of Twitter for “marketing, customer service, and even job placements”. When we do a social networking retention policy these days we address acceptable business uses of the technology, proper retention, privacy, etc. But remember just because technologies can be used for a business purpose, does not mean that they should be used at all. So make the business case and if you can then get the technology. Before implementing it, develop policy that properly manages it. Thereafter if you can’t readily retain it, you better tell business users that if content needs to be retained but cant with the technology used, then they need to communicate in a different way.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Faster, better and cheaper

If you don’t have enough to do in your RIM activities, have I got a job for you. Responding to litigation is an exercise in futility. You have to produce anything and everything relevant to the case. But for most bigger institutions there is no way to even know if you have most of the relevant stuff let alone all of it. If your in RIM, your job is likely limited to making retention rules and make sure they are followed. What about adding to your full plate by developing rules about things need to be put. One of our clients took on the responsibility of developing the Office of Contract management. All final contracts will be stored there making finding them for business reasons of producing them for litigation that much easier. So start developing rules about where to store content and RIM life and litigation response will be faster, better and cheaper.

Friday, October 23, 2009

"Go Green" with RIM

I think all RIM professionals should think about the business benefits of their RIM program and policy directives as part of larger business initiatives to “Go Green”. Not because it is cool to be environmentally conscious, but because it helps them align their thinking with that of the executives on savings and being perceived a good corporate citizen. If we only retain what is required, and as few copies as needed, then we save loads of money, time and energy. Start thinking like an executive—its good for your career.


BTW-Americans received 17 billion mailed paper catalogues in 2008—56 for every American (Wall Street Journal, October 16, 2009). So we are far from paperless.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Policy First

In the November 2009 edition of PCTODAY Magazine, in an article entitled “Twitter for Business”, the author explores the use of Twitter for “marketing, customer service, and even job placements”. When we do a social networking retention policy these days we address acceptable business uses of the technology, proper retention, privacy, etc. But remember just because technologies can be used for a business purpose, does not mean that they should be used at all. So make the business case and if you can, then get the technology. Before implementing it, develop policy that properly manages it. Thereafter, if you can’t readily retain it, you better tell business users that if content needs to be retained but can't with the technology used, then they need to communicate in a different way.

Monday, October 12, 2009

The Ongoing Work of IMC (Key #7: Continuous Program Improvement) - Highlights of chapter 19 of the second edition of Information Nation

Every organization must strive to continually improve its Information Management program. Every program has flaws and weaknesses that need to be addressed. Every program goes out of date with current best practices, laws and technology unless it is continuously revised and revisited. Every program can be better.

Email is a technology used by virtually all businesses. Unfortunately, many organizations did not update their Information Management policies and procedures to account for the technology. As a result, an avalanche of court cases and legal actions related to the use and misuse of email began, and organizations were forced to retroactively change their Information Management practices. Many learned their lessons the hard way, feeling the pain of harassment lawsuits and mass employee terminations.

Which of the newer technologies appear to be taking a similar path? Read about them in the second edition of Information Nation, available from John W. Wiley & Sons. For more information, see www.informationnationbook.com.

Comments? Contact the author at infonation@kahnconsultinginc.com.